About Enterprise JavaBeans components  EJB 2.0 differences from 1.1

Chapter 6: Enterprise JavaBeans Overview

EAServer EJB support

EAServer can host Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) components developed according to version 2.0, 1.1, or 1.0 of the Enterprise JavaBeans specification. EAServer supports session beans and entity beans with bean-managed persistence or container-managed persistence. EAServer uses CORBA 2.3 as the basis for the EJB component support, allowing interoperability with other client and component models and with CORBA-2.3-compliant ORBs from other vendors.


Running EJB components in EAServer

EAServer can host Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) components developed according to version 2.0, 1.1, or 1.0 of the Enterprise JavaBeans specification. EAServer supports session beans and entity beans with bean-managed persistence or container-managed persistence. EAServer uses CORBA 2.3 as the basis for the EJB component support, allowing interoperability with other client and component models and with ORBs from other vendors that are compliant with CORBA 2.3.

You can run Enterprise JavaBeans as EAServer components using any of these techniques:

EAServer also supports the Enterprise JavaBeans client model. You can generate EJB-style proxies for any IDL interface, and use the proxies to call methods on components that implement that interface.


EJB clients connecting to EAServer

EAServer also supports the Enterprise JavaBeans client model by generating EJB proxies and providing an EJB-compliant implementation of the JNDI NamingContext class. You can generate EJB-style proxies for any IDL interface (not just those associated with EJB components), and use the proxies to call methods on components that implement that interface. The NamingContext class can also be used in EJB components to instantiate home interfaces for intercomponent calls.


For more information

For information about

See this chapter or section

Creating, importing, and exporting EJB components.

Chapter 7, “Creating Enterprise JavaBeans Components”

Creating EJB clients, generating EJB stubs, instantiating home and remote interface proxies, managing transactions, and serializing and deserializing bean proxies.

Chapter 8, “Creating Enterprise JavaBeans Clients”

Configuring container-managed persistence for entity beans and passivation of stateful session beans

“Configuring automatic or EJB CMP persistence”

Invoking non-EJB components from EJB clients and invoking EJB components from non-EJB clients, and using EAServer with EJB 2.0 containers from other vendors.

Chapter 9, “EAServer EJB Interoperability”





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